Articles matching tag: College Athletes

  1. Column: Harvard Punishes Wrong IndividualsNovember 10, 2016

    Harvard University recently suspended the men’s soccer team for the remainder of the season after it was revealed that the 2012 men’s soccer team published a “scouting report” on their counterparts on the women’s team. The nine-page report had nothing to do with the women’s soccer ability; it was based on their sexual attractiveness and perceived sexual interests. In an email announcing the suspension to Harvard student-athletes, athletic director Robert L. Scalise said, “We strongly believe that this immediate and significant action is absolutely necessary if we are to create an environment of mutual support, respect, and trust among our students and our teams.” While the goal of his message is certainly important, the action designed to accomplish it - suspending the team - was wrong on a number of levels.

  2. Column: Baylor University Brought To TaskJune 2, 2016

    After a damning report chronicled the mishandling of numerous sexual assaults on campus, Baylor University announced the suspension with the intent to fire its football coach, the demotion of its President and the probation of its Athletic Director. Despite the apparent severity of those penalties, given the horrific nature of the actions described in the report, they are both insufficient and come way too late.

  3. Column: Salary Cap For College AthletesJanuary 14, 2016

    In a recent piece in The New York Times, Joe Nocera proposed a salary cap for college teams along with individual player salaries, specifically for those that play Division I football and men’s basketball. It’s not the first time Nocera has advanced the concept. Four years ago he recommended paying college athletes and then, as if his idea was a fait accompli, went on to suggest a salary cap. In his latest column, Nocera elaborates on his salary proposal and ends with the statement, “That’s my idea for paying college athletes. If you’ve got a better one, I’d love to hear it. We can argue about it on Twitter.” Unlike Joe, I’m not a tweeter so here’s my response: I don’t believe we should pay college athletes so there’s no need to debate the specifics of a salary cap.

  4. Column: Should Students Be Funding the College Arms Race?December 17, 2015

    It takes lots of money to field college athletic teams. But few college athletic programs are generating their own funding. To support their programs, college athletic departments have received $10.3 billion in student fees and other subsidies in the past five years, with student fees accounting for nearly half that total. Those numbers come from a joint study conducted by The Chronicle of Higher Education and the Huffington Post. The study reviewed financial data submitted to the NCAA by 201 public schools in Division I (most private schools are exempt from filing such information). The authors of the study found that students at some schools pay as much as $1,500 annually to help finance athletic programs.

  5. Column: Food Is The New Recruiting ToolNovember 4, 2015

    Most U.S. households would be aghast if their food budget increased 145% in one year. But that’s exactly what happened at a number of colleges this year after the NCAA lifted restrictions on feeding student-athletes. The restrictions, which limited meals to one training table per day, were implemented in 1991 in an effort to preserve competitive balance among schools. Of course, competitive balance was then, as it is now, a sham. Institutions with athletic budgets of $30 million or less compete against behemoths like the University of Texas with an annual budget of $165 million. Limiting the food expense was either a way to hold down expenses or an opportunity for schools to divert money to other uses, for example, coaches’ salaries. In the latest USA Today salary survey of football coaches, the top 35 earn $3 million or more per year.

  6. Column: Sex Scandal at University of LouisvilleOctober 28, 2015

    The University of Louisville (U of L) is clearly prioritizing winning basketball games over honesty, integrity and ethics. In June, the U of L signed its men’s basketball coach, Rick Pitino, to a 10-year contract extension that kicks in next season. The 62-year old Pitino will be paid an average of $5 million per year in guaranteed salary plus $7.5 million in retention bonuses if he stays through the 2015-16 season. Pitino could also earn $250,000 per year in academic bonuses and an additional $500,000 in any year his team wins a national championship.

  7. Column: A New Day for College CoachesAugust 31, 2015

    “The Times They Are a-Changin’” by Bob Dylan. For college coaches, Bob Dylan’s title track to his 1964 album could just as easily apply today. Examples of the changing tide in collegiate athletics abound, the most recent being the termination of Illinois football coach Tim Beckman on the eve of the 2015 season. At first glance, Beckman’s firing could be attributed to his 12-25 record over three non-descript seasons at Illinois. But the decision to fire Beckman had nothing to do with wins and losses. Earlier this year the University commissioned an investigation after allegations surfaced that Beckman and his staff had influenced medical decisions and mistreated players. The coach was let go even before a final report was issued.

  8. Column: Video Gaming Goes CollegiateAugust 17, 2015

    Given a choice, most parents would probably prefer that their children spend more time playing sports and less time playing computer games in the hopes that the former may lead to a college scholarship. Now, the latter may also lead to a free education. Robert Morris University (RMU) in Chicago and the University of Pikeville (UPike) in Kentucky are the first institutions of higher learning to offer scholarships for what is commonly known as eSports, what laymen refer to as playing computer games. Competitive gaming on the professional level has been around for decades but the collegiate version dates to 2009 when students at Princeton challenged their counterparts at MIT to a match of StarCraft. Around the same time a student at the University of California San Diego started his own team and the two groups decided to form a league which they named the Collegiate Starleague (CSL).

  9. Column: College Athletes Unrealistic About Playing ProFebruary 9, 2015

    “You can do anything you want to do.” How many of us have heard those words spoken by parents, teachers, coaches and peers? But as I tell my students, those words should be taken with a healthy dose of reality. And that admonition is especially true for college athletes. Why? According to data compiled by the NCAA, far too many college athletes in every sport have an unrealistic view of their chances to play pro. Every four years, the NCAA conducts what it calls a GOALS Study (Growth, Opportunities, Aspirations and Learning of Students in college). The detailed study is a survey of student-athletes in a variety of sports - men’s and women’s - across all three divisions. Student-athletes are asked a broad range of questions about their college experiences including their future expectations to play sports professionally.